It’s Race Week

Race at Cowboys Stadium!This Saturday I’ll be in the stadium of the Dallas Cowboys doing the Spartan Sprint. I am so excited to be able to compete in the stadium of my all time favorite sports team!! This will be the shortest distance Spartan Race I’ve ever done, but I’m betting that the obstacles and bleachers will make up for the 3 mile distance, still providing a fun and challenging course. I am a die hard Dallas Cowboys fan, and always have been. This race represents an opportunity to sweat, struggle and perform in the same arena as the Cowboys on Sundays. What a wild and awesome experience. My first ever stadium race and I hear they are a different animal. Without the necessity for long distance endurance, more explosive athletes may have a better day.  This week I’m getting prepared to race my best race, I have nutrition and training at the best they’ve been so far. I’ve been really honing in my training and improving the consistency. I know that after my races in May (posts and videos to come) that I will have to really continue to innovate, improve, and invest in my training. I want to be at a true elite level, not just paying the extra money to sign up for the elite heats, but really being at my best and competing at a level worthy of the title elite. I have a long way to go and mountains to climb on my journey to the pinnacle of my own performance. But this Saturday I’m going to enjoy how far I’ve come and the chance to Throw Up the X on the Jumbotron at JerryWorld. I’ll be capturing and creating content over the weekend to showcase this unique and exciting experience. Wish me luck!

BattleFrog vs. Spartan Race. How did it measure up? (In my opinion)

April 11th 2015 I volunteered with some friends at BattleFrog Dallas. At that point, I had ran 4 Spartan races as my primary reference point for the Obstacle Course Racing world. What did I think of the BattleFrog? Does it live up to it’s Spartan counterpart? Let me tell you that BattleFrog is a serious race, and I was very impressed with the obstacles and course design. Volunteering was a truly fulfilling experience too, and I highly recommend it to anybody, not just for the free race either.

My friend Liam is a Beast, he could have won the Open Category race that day, but was slowing down to run with me.

My friend Liam is a Beast, he could have won the Open Category race that day, but was slowing down to run with me. I was struggling with this obstacle!!

Volunteering was fun? Yes, without a doubt. Being behind the scenes of an OCR event was a cool perspective, and made me totally respect all the volunteers even more at every race! There is so much work that goes into these races, and it’s easy to just show up run it and never give it a second thought. I was an elite course marshall on the 12ft wall and it was a great experience. Being able to help people overcome the obstacle from a physical and mental standpoint was very rewarding. There were a few racers I remember in particular, racers who I helped get over the top, through words of encouragement, and bringing out their own determination. I often heard “I can’t do it!” or “I’m going to fail.” To those affirming the negative, I would repeat with great force “Don’t say that! You CAN do it!” or “You’re almost there, don’t give up!!” To see someone who once vehemently believed they couldn’t accomplish something, change their mind-set and overcome the wall was really special. Seeing others in that situation gives me a good perspective when I’m suffering on a tough course or through a tough training session.

What makes BattleFrog tough? Is it tougher then a Spartan Race? I think BattleFrog presents more challenging obstacles, especially for grip strength and the upper body. I felt as challenged at the BattleFrog Dallas as I did at the Dallas Beast 2014, but the running was much less. The course was designed to strategically call on grip strength endurance, and overall strength endurance something which I found out was a real weakness in my repertoire. Not just being able to do monkey bars, carry gas cans and sandbags, but doing so during a distance running event in a sequence designed to promote total muscle fatigue. I personally realized during the gas can carry that my grip was weak, and my left arm was giving out sooner than my right. I had to stop several times and put the cans down. After that there were many walls, ropes, monkey bars and structures to climb and all required the grip strength that I had fatigued immensely carrying the 20lb gas cans earlier. Very challenging, and helped me re-visit my training protocols and include grip strength routines often. Overall BattleFrog gave any Spartan Race I’ve done a run for it’s money—and speaking of running for money, they pay the elite winners more then Spartan Race does. Is one race superior? To me both have their merits and I’ll continue to race both brands. I was just surprised that BattleFrog was able to hold its own and actually be more challenging than Spartans in some aspects.

I am committed to continuing my fitness journey and testing my progress via obstacle course races. I will be racing a minimum of 3 more Spartan Races this year: Cowboys Stadium in Dallas, Lake Tahoe World Championship Beast course, and the Dallas Beast. I would really like to fit another Battle Frog in there too. Have you done an Obstacle Course Race, or several? Any comments or opinions?

Where Do I Stand in 2015? Two Years of Blogging

The finish line of the Spartan Super in Austin May 2014. My 2nd OCR race and first piece of 2014 Spartan Trifecta

The finish line of the Spartan Super in Austin May 2014. My 2nd OCR race and first piece of 2014 Spartan Trifecta

This post is essentially my previous list from 2013 of where I stood in all Renaissance pursuits I’m currently endeavoring towards. I’ve edited parts of the list but many are unchanged. I still remain undaunted, I know only my own actions and priorities can  make any of my goals fulfilled. Anything indicated with bold type face or an (*) indicates a revision from my previous list. I like to do this, and plan on doing it more frequently. It’s a way of self-accountability that I think is good for me to develop.

Every so often it’s good to take a step back, analyze progress (or stagnation), and make adjustments, and to publish updates on 2-year-old content!!!! Wow.

Here goes…

Learning Languages: 2015: Overall: Not that much progress outside of Spanish. Reminder to get to work and build it into my schedule!

Japanese: 2015: No real progress or time devoted to learning. 

– Read hiragana and katakana but writing needs work

-An ear for pronunciation

-Limited vocabulary

Spanish: 2015: Made some great progress, but only through personal interactions, a little sideline study and focus was observed briefly. 

-Decent pronunciation

-Kitchen Vocabulary

-Bad words

-Sounding out reading, but lack comprehension

French: 2015: No Progress made

-Conjugating regular verbs

-Ear for pronunciation/conversation

-Latent vocabulary & reading/writing from high-school.

[* ]Business(es): 2015: Basically in the same situation other than I’ve put myself in a position where starting a business is now on my daily to do list and I’m taking actions to bring it to fruition. *UPDATE: Now enrolled in Business Breakthrough Academy*

-I have some great start-up ideas swirling around.  I’m very confident in 3/10 of the ideas, and have taken action towards launch and lean launch.*

-Potential for a pop-up restaurant is high. I have a good network within the hospitality industry, and the market is prime for a great pop up.

-My dreams of film/TV production are still dreams, *but I’ve met some people who can bring them to fruition perhaps.

-Using apps and technology to automate income is similar to my start-up ideas; action has been taken towards realization: capturing ideas on paper. I’ve got one rock solid idea though, and about 8 mediocre ones.

-Developing a school would be a legacy project, and I’ve yet to build the requisite resources or fully master many teachable skills.

Health and Fitness: 2015: Definitely learned a great amount about my body and health/fitness in general

-The quest for the six-pack is ongoing. Starting to lean out and loose the last 5% body fat that it takes. (for progress shots see my Instagram)

-Personal trainer certification is a goal for the next 90 days. Studying between 4-10 hours a week.

-Healthy eating is becoming a passion. making better choices and structuring a diet based on nutritional benefit and balance is something I study between 5-10 hours a week.

-Yoga has helped me immensely since I started 4 years ago. I’m still not as flexible as I’m striving for, but quite an improvement. Always end my training sessions with yoga/stretching.

UPDATE*** Use foam rolling to recover faster, lacrosse balls for isolated muscle tension issues, and go to a specialist in acupressure and Eastern medicine techniques.

2015: So far completed 25/200 miles on a 12 person team relay, and a Battle Frog US Race.

Going hard to the finish line of a battlefrog race April 2015.

Going hard to the finish line of a battlefrog race April 2015.

Martial Arts:

-Reached a meager yellow belt in Judo at age 13, but have not practiced since.

-Starting from scratch in this field.

Music:

-Played trumpet for 2 years in junior high.

-Messed around with DJ/production software: Reason, Traktor.

Food:

-Started cooking at a young age— starting with eggs at age 8.

-Immersed in the hospitality industry my whole life up this point and presently.

-Apprenticed and worked under one of the best chefs in my city, and a crew of renowned sous-chefs, for a year and a half. The restaurant made #3 on a list of Best New Restaurants in Texas.

-Studying techniques, recipes, and ingredients from a wide variety of sources.

-Shifting focus recently to nutrient dense, and maximally healthy dishes/ingredients, while still maintaining flavor development.

-Achieved a good flow while cooking on the line, loved to improve this day in day out.

UPDATE: ** Food was my entire focus in 2014, and now has gone very far back burner. 2014 was a year of accolades and success in this area. Posts to come.

Love:

-I’ve been in love once, maybe twice.

-Quite a bit to do and accomplish in this area.

Travel:

-I have traveled internationally 3 times: United Kingdom (age 8), Mexico (age 18), and Japan (age 24). Within North America, I’ve seen a good deal of western Canada, parts of the southern United States and Texas …far from well traveled, but I’ve traveled enough to give me the “travel bug”.

-I have only lived abroad once, and that’s my current 4+year stint in Texas.

-I have traveled to Hollywood and Beverly Hills in 2015

-Took a road trip to Atlanta, Georgia in 2015

-Traveled through much of South Texas on a 200 mile relay race running with a team. 2015

Learning Wealth:

-Studying Napoleon Hill, Rhonda Byrne, Darren Hardy and others.

-Recently had the most money I’d ever had at one time.

-Make small donations monthly to 2 organizations through my job.

UPDATE**** Reading Jack Canfield’s Success Principles right now, The Entrepreneurs Solution, and enrolled Mel Abraham’s Business Breakthrough Academy and also in Brendon Burchard’s top 2% Course.

Driving:

-Driven some wonderful vehicles.

-Racing and drifting have not been attempted or learned.

-Drive often presently, so skill is improving.

Art:

-Appreciating art in all its forms more and more as I age.

-Haven’t created any art since high school art class, and that was hardly considerable.

Properties/Homes:

-Am in pursuit of my first property

Teaching/Helping/Giving Back:

-I’m acquiring more skills and knowledge in order to better teach people in the future.

-Set an example of good work ethic in jobs that I’ve had in my career, but working smarter is ongoing.

UPDATE****Volunteered at a Battle Frog race and helped many overcome the 12 foot wall obstacle.

Agriculture:

-I’ve planed 6* trees.

-I have an aloe plant

-Starting to grow Chia.

As you can see from this inventory, I’ve  still got a long way to go in almost everything. This doesn’t deter me, nor should it deter anybody who sets out to achieve anything. I’d rather take the time to assess where I am, so that I can always look back as I progress and reach benchmarks, (2015-as I just have). As opposed to saying “there’s too much work to be done” I say “here’s a way to measure my work against something. Everybody starts somewhere…

Started from the bottom…–Drake

Moving forward I’ll be writing and publishing detailed posts in each of these categories as I learn and experience new things, but also delve into what I’ve learned in the past in more detail.

Thanks for reading, and leave me any comments you have.

My first Spartan Race…the Texas Beast 2013: Part 1

Time has certainly flew by since I last posted about my pre race preparation, fears, and excitement leading up to the 2013 Texas Spartan Beast. I never got around to publishing a follow-up, or any posts whatsoever until last week, due to my new job and the demands required of me (another post on this to come).

All that aside I want to share what it was like that fateful day—December 15th, 2013.

I had my Up band in a plastic bag in my camelbak tracking my steps...might not be 100% accurate, but closer than nothing.

I had my Up band in a plastic bag in my camelbak tracking my steps…might not be 100% accurate, but closer than nothing.

What was it like?
My first Spartan Race really blew me away. These races are large-scale undertakings, and nearly a festival atmosphere. Music, food, merchandise, and ongoing fitness challenges throughout the main event area, along with a great view of the finish line and last few challenges. You see the apprehension and nerves on competitors about to embark onto the course, and you see the look of exhilaration, satisfaction, and exhaustion on those who have already finished. Arrive and pick up your race package…with the warning YOU MAY DIE in loud bold print. The contents includes bib/number, tracking and timing bracelet, headband, and other pertinent race day documents/items. I’ll never forget lining up at the start line and seeing those surrounding me with the mix or excitement and trepidation. A master of ceremonies ignites the crowd with a Spartan speech enticing “Sons and Daughters of Sparta” (racers) with glory. A loud response of “AROO!” is given in reply. A remote control aircraft with GoPro camera captures the action for promotional and social media purposes. The MC then pops the tops on a couple of smoke grenades and throws them directly in what will be the first few steps of a 15.5 mile journey. The signal is then given that the race has begun and the first obstacle is the obstructed vision from the grenades. Once out of the starting gates the strong runners and those who chose to be at the front quickly separate themselves from the pack of average racers. I was advised (and thankfully so) to maintain my own pace, and not get caught up in the foot race aspect of this event. It will be a long day and my energy reserves will be needed for the last miles. I am keeping a decent pace, fueled by adrenaline and the substantial nutrition packed fuel I’ve ingested. Others pass me, I pass others as we enter the first real obstacle. Balancing on small tree trunk sized logs and jumping between them. My shoes are already pretty muddy, and the poor fellow in front of me looks to have the same problem. He makes an awkward attempt to leap from one log to the next and slips out sideways…impacting his ribs on the log as he plummets. Wow, I think to myself…too early in the game to hurt myself like that. Once I’m up on there and noticing traction problems myself I’m quick to jump down and voluntarily take the 30 burpee penalty and not potentially end my race 3/4 of a mile in. Running after those first burpees was tough, but I soon regained my steady pace. The next few miles were some of the toughest in the race when it came to running…about 5 miles of hill climbs and descents over treacherous terrain. To me the hardest obstacle of the day, and what really killed me was at the end of the hill section. The Bucket Brigade: fill a 5 gallon bucket to the top with around 75 lbs of gravel, then ascend a steep muddy hill, and descend another route. I messed up on this, and due to the non honest nature of another racer ended up having to repeat it (30 burpee penalty not an option). At the top of the hill it was common practice to put the buckets down and catch ones breath before the downhill portion. I witnessed some people with less than allowable levels of gravel grabbing dirt and sticks and anything they could find to add to their buckets to reach the permissible level. At the time I thought little of this, due to being quite tired, and aiming to recover. My bucket was then grabbed by one such racer, and I was left with a less than full bucket. I didn’t notice until the bottom when I had to repeat due to a level of gravel that wasn’t acceptable. I was totally pissed off because I knew mine was full when I started. (Pro Tip: Sit on your bucket to avoid this) Repeating this obstacle probably took me 25- 35 minutes and drained plenty of my energy. All I could do was to push onwards. However, the hill section also held one of the coolest obstacles of the day…the memory challenge. Based on the racers bib number they must look up a code on a large board, and then memorize it for later recital. I saw other racers bust out the pen and paper to help them, but I chose a different approach. I would recite the code sequentially the steps I took and my breathing. I ran nearly the next 8 miles expecting to have to recite it, and eventually gave up, annoyed by constantly repeating this code in my head. I figured it would be a few miles after the board, maximum…but it was around 10 miles later. Many miles and obstacles later I came across and open area where people were doing burpees for what looked like no reason. No monkey bars, no gravel buckets, nothing that gave an indication as I approached. “What’s the password?” No way. Really!? I just tried to stop reciting it about 3 miles ago and now I’m prompted to remember. Somehow I remember it and pay no penalty. Great! I did well on most obstacles…failing only 2 entering the home stretch—the first obstacle of the log jumps, and then I failed the rope traverse (next time I’m letting my arms recover after the Hercules Hoist). Another bucket brigade of a less dramatic incline was included in the last few miles and that was a tough one! I ran through a creek bed with water in it and was wondering how much longer this was going on for when suddenly I popped out and could see the finish line…but some of the toughest obstacles remained between me and my medal. The traverse wall, and climbing a rope from a submerged in water starting point. I failed both, the traverse wall—30 burpees!(I just had bad technique as I’d later learn). I also had bad technique on the rope climb and was forced to dyno for a higher knot but failed to grip the rope, so I plummeted into the muddy waters below. Disoriented and exhausted I emerged to do another 30 burpees doubling my previous total in the last 500 feet to the finish. I was dragging and suffering at this point. Then something happened. I heard a faint voice of encouragement from the crowd: “Do it for Canada!” I suddenly spun around to see my friend and race mate standing in the crowd watching me. A few things all flowed through my head “how long has he been waiting for me?” “he certainly must have had an easier time then me.” “How long have I been out here on the course?” but overall the encouragement powered me through the last half of the burpees and then it was on to the finish. Pretty simple obstacles of the slippery wall and the fire jump stood between me and the end of a hard day. As I was climbing the slippery wall a volunteer offered his hand to help me overcome the obstacle…I refused, determined to use my gumption to get to the finish or pay the penalty. I drew up the last of my reserves and beat the wall, jumped the fire and sprinted the rest of the distance to the finish line.

Determined to finish!

Determined to finish!

5 hours flat was my time.

My results

My results

My friend placed 6th overall in the open category beating me by 2 hours with a time of 3 hours flat. A medal and a banana were pressed in my hand as I crossed, and I couldn’t help, but think of the branding Spartan Race has used—“You’ll know at the finish line.” That is the most apt description of how I felt. I definitely knew. I realized I had much more capabilities than previously known, and I also knew that this wouldn’t be the last time I finished a spartan race. And it hasn’t been…

A Huge Challenge and Commitment…The Spartan Beast

I have my work cut out for me as I’ve committed to The Spartan Beast. This race will be a substantial physical and mental challenge: over 12 Miles and

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25+ obstacles to complete. I signed up in late June, and will be competing as part of a team, calling ourselves—Heroes United. The event is taking place December 15th/2013 in Glen Rose TX. Weather is another consideration and prospective challenge during this event. It could potentially be cold, windy, or (very unlikely) snowing and that makes certain potential obstacles even more difficult, mainly any involving water. Freezing water, coupled with cold wind sounds terrible during a grueling physical activity. But, I am not deterred, I’m determined.

 

Why did I choose to participate in such madness?

Sometimes I need to challenge myself. Who am I kidding, I ALWAYS need to be challenging myself. I’ve learned that embracing change and creating positive change are essential parts of adult life.I think you’re supposed to do a ‘sprint’, then ‘super’ then ‘beast’. But I’m diving into the deep end and fully committing to something that is arguably beyond my capabilities. Or at least it was. Training for a challenge like this has already been a great learning experience and I think my fitness has greatly improved already. My goals for this race are to first and foremost FINISH the race in good health, secondly to complete 80% of obstacles without penalty, and thirdly to enjoy the experience, while learning and improving myself. I had originally intended to finish with a high placing (top 25), but have recently decided that my main competitor is myself, and that’s the way I’m looking at it. I’d rather go at my own pace, pushing my own limits then compete with the pack mentality for a place number, and see where I stand at the end. However, with that being said I wouldn’t be opposed to a top 40 finish as a bonus to my own internal competition. One of the cool things about doing an event like this is that it will be a force multiplier for lots of my other goals; and an actual evaluation point for a 2013 goal I set at the beginning of this year. “Train and Push myself to be in the absolute best shape I’ve ever been in.” That’s how the goal on my wall reads. What better way to cross that off then finishing off the year with a challenge like the Spartan Beast. It’s also helping me achieve more specific goals (Force Multiplier)  that I have such as: have a 6 pack(then an 8 pack), and train in a dynamic & balanced way. Leading up to and doing this event are both ways of making those goals realized. So there’s a lot of aspects as to why I’m participating.

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I became the first to join/create this habit on lift.do ( I call this pioneering)

Fortunately, I’m tracking myself in a few different ways so that can be actually analyzed to a degree. I created a lift habit on Oct. 27th (actually pioneered this one–see photo) for Spartan Beast Training. I’ve got 17 checkins since October 27th. I used notes to record what I did for a workout too, often with details. I have 39 Checkins (but that is with a solid month and a half of not tracking anything on lift) since signing up for this on July 2nd. That’s not a lot, to some, and lots to others—I know I could have been more disciplined and trained more. Looking at the data charted over a calendar you can see some cool things. Also I’ve had my Jawbone UP band for 77 days as of today, and have recorded runs and workouts through the app as diligently as possible (didn’t have the band for about 7 days waiting for replacement to arrive…it just abruptly died one day). Longest run I tracked with the UP band was 10.44 miles at 8.9min/mile. In the last month I’ve been doing a lot of total body workouts with compound movements, and medium to heavy weight. Lots will argue against the total body workout, but I’ve found pretty effective results (in my mind) using them.

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This was exactly how long (when I checked it) until I should be warming up and stretching for the race.

Overall, I’m excited to take this on. With proper hydration, nutrition, stretching/warm up, and recovery I think I’ve got a good chance. December 15th I’ll find out.